Key Qualities of a Parent-coach
 

Key Qualities of a Parent-coach That Can Help You Become a Great Parent

Coach your kids to success!

By Focus on the Family Singapore | 26 March, 2018

Parenthood is the career of our lifetime; it is an investment with huge rewards but it also comes with responsibilities and obligations. We want to support our child through the different phases of their development, while still guiding them with values and rules backed by wisdom and reason.

Imagine what it would be like if we saw ourselves as coaches, with our children on the same team! It could transform the way we parent, and the relationships we form with our children.

Here are 7 qualities of a Parent-Coach that will empower you to parent effectively:

  • Proactive

    Instead of being caught off-guard and reacting when things happen, the Parent-Coach thinks and plans ahead for issues that may crop up. The Parent-Coach uses the events of daily life as opportunities to train our children and equip them with lessons for life.
  • Intentional

    Prevention is better than cure! Find opportunities to understand your children, stay close to them and maintain an open dialogue, so that you can lay a strong foundation for the later teen years. Be aware of your thoughts and actions, as the way you think and respond to your child will affect how you build them up.
  • Firm yet flexible

    Be in-charge and confident – but not so rigid that you cannot adapt to meet the changing needs of your growing child. The Parent-Coach is loving and consistent, even in the face of a demanding or challenging child!
  • A guide

    Just as how a coach sets the gameplay, you set the pace of your children’s growth, and help them stay engaged without feeling overwhelmed or daunted by difficulties. You can help them articulate their vision, plan out their goals, and give them the support they need to tackle challenges.

    To guide them, you have to stay in touch with them and their unique experiences. Be present to journey with them and prepare them for the future.
  • A leader

    Use your parental authority to help your children see that they are on the same team. As members of a family, you look out for and help one another. This helps them to know that they are never alone and that they have a unique role to play in the family.
  • A role model

    As Parent-Coaches, model for your children the values you desire to see. In doing so, you lay the foundations that will serve as a moral compass for the rest of their lives. When your children become adults, they will have to fly on their own. The time that you have with them is limited and therefore precious. Your presence throughout their growing years is a gift to them because they learn the most from watching you live your life.
  • A confidante

    A good coach believes in his players’ potential and expects their best, but also encourages them when they make mistakes so they don’t have a fear of failure. Let your children know that you expect the best from them, and that you will be there to encourage and help them scale the heights they need to climb.

May we inspire our children, just like a good sports coach would inspire their athletes to do their best.

Remembering and applying these qualities of a Parent-Coach can enable us to be the parent we want to be. Don’t be discouraged by initial setbacks as things will get better with practice.

These are strategic years. By adopting such informed, involved and intentional parenting strategies, we can enjoy healthy relationships with our children that will bear fruit for generations!


© 2018 Focus on the Family Singapore. All rights reserved.

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